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Sunset T'ai Chi on the Lawn - Fall 2022

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Title

Sunset T'ai Chi on the Lawn - Fall 2022

When

Thu. Sep 1, 2022 - Thu. Nov 3, 2022 (10 weeks)
Every Thursday from 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Where

The Lawn — In Front of the Rotunda

Beginning 10/13 class will be held from 6:00-7:00pm to capture more daylight.

RAIN LOCATION
In case of rain, use this Zoom link 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85878754646?pwd=Ym1vVURxamh4L3lFS1kwcWhZVTR1Zz09

Meeting ID: 858 7875 4646
Passcode: 986559

This class is free and open to the public. All levels of experience are welcome!   

Instructor: Hiromi Johnson
 
This class, co-sponsored with Compassionate Care Initiative, will cover the basics of T'ai Chi, a martial art form developed in China centuries ago for self defense. Aside from the many physical benefits of T'ai Chi, the slow, continuous, and flowing movements of the practice lower stress; promote resilience; and enhance focus and concentration. Performed quietly in unison with a group, T’ai Chi also can increase harmony among particpants.
 
Learn more about the benefits of practicing T’ai Chi
While the movements improve physical health, the meditative aspects of T’ai Chi also improve emotional well-being and decrease the effects of depression and anxiety. Additionally, learning a new skill improves neural pathways, fundamentally rewiring the brain.
 
Research
A 2008 American College Health Survey at Arizona State University (ASU) found that the most frequent factors negatively impacting academic performance within the last 12 months were stress (20.3%), sleep difficulties (16.5%), and anxiety (14.6%). A meta-analysis found T’ai Chi to have a moderate effect on symptoms of anxiety (Hedges’ g = 0.66, in Wang et al., 2010.) T’ai Chi classes at ASU demonstrated that increased mindfulness was associated with improved sleep, self-regulatory self-efficacy, mood, and perception of stress (Caldwell et al., 2010, 2011). There were increases in the capacity for mindfulness and improved sleep across the semester for T’ai Chi students while no change was detected in the control group (Caldwell 2011). 

Find more contemplative practice offerings here.